THE PAUL WALL
 
So, the fiery NW blew our fabulous 'Paul Wall' recently ...what a tragic loss! We are trying to save as much of his art as possible...but most is sadly damaged.
 
You’ll notice a Shabbychic tin wall in its place for the moment.
 
If you don’t know the story of the wall, read on!
 
Originally painted in September 2011 together with the children of schools of Hout Bay, the famous Paul Wall is the first vibrant visual that greeted market visitors on arrival to our nook of the bay.
 
On the 8th of September 2014, Paul Du Toit’s artwork on the external walls of The Bay Harbour Market was revitalized and restored. This restoration was the section was blown down as winds howled through Hout Bay last week!
 
Market co-founder Anthony Stroebel an internationally acclaimed artist and Hout Bay local resident and South African artist Paul Du Toit originally embarked on this project, with a shared vision of transforming the perimeter wall of the old fishing factory into an expansive work of art, now known as The Paul Wall.
 
Since it's inception three years ago, the market has evolved from an old factory into a thriving retail precinct, showcasing the best of South African culture, authentic crafts and local art. The Paul Wall is testament to this, and is the first work of art visitors see upon arrival at the market.
 
The walls of the market came alive in what Paul described as an “energy and movement theme” and since his passing, have been a marvellous visual reminder of his eternal presence at the Bay Harbour Market.
 
Paul along with local school children from Hout Bay, injected energy and life into the Bay Harbour Market which has become known as a beautiful example of transformation, where a sense of ownership and pride in the area has been established.
 
The wall murals at Bay Harbour Market stand out as a badge of upliftment, and social development. Their restoration aims to honour Paul Du Toit, his family and his legacy.
 
Luckily there are still a few remnants of the wall, and a beautiful part of it that was painted by the Lalela students.




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